A Stellar Christmas Story: The “Star” of Bethlehem

In the mood for an astrological Christmas story worth telling?

The following is an excerpt from my book, The 2020 Guide: Astrology of Happiness. It has Astrology, History, Storytelling, Happiness Science, and a whiff of magical lore to keep you on the edge of your seat. I hope you enjoy it.

Please feel free to share this and to have a wonderful holiday season. 🌟✨💕 Magi on camels following star of Bethlehem

“Now when Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judea in the days of Herod the king behold there came wise men from the East to Jerusalem saying where is he that is born King of the Jews? For we have seen his star in the East, and have come to worship him… Then Herod, when he had privily called the wise men, inquired of them diligently what time the star appeared. And he sent them to Bethlehem, and said, go and search diligently for the young child; and when ye have found him, bring me word again, that I may come and worship him also. When they had heard the king, they departed; and, lo, the star, which they sought in the east, went before them, till it came and stood over where the young child was. When they saw the star, they rejoiced with exceeding great joy. And when they were come into the house, they saw the young child with Mary his mother, and fell down, and worshiped him… And being warned of God in a dream that they should not return to Herod, they departed into their own country another way.” St. Matthew star of Bethlehem as a planetary alignmentMost astrologers (and astronomers) today think it was the Jupiter – Saturn Conjunction that took place in Pisces in 7 BC, fused into “one exceptionally bright light.” That conjunction also coincided with the meeting of the two massive (zodiacal) cycles – the tropical and the sidereal.

 

This happens only once every 26,000 years. 

It therefore signified the dawning of a new grand cycle of ages.

As Kepler wrote: “He (God) appointed the birth of his son Christ our Savior exactly at the time of the great conjunction and the signs of the fishes (Pisces) and the ram (Aries) near the equinoctial point”

That is to say, just as the vernal equinox, by precession, moved backward into the constellation before it in the zodiac. The best biblical scholarship today also places the birth of Jesus at about that time.” * (The Fated Sky Astrology In History, Benson Bobrick pp 77-79) It’s interesting to note that Jesus was often described as the “Lamb of God” and that Aries is symbolized by a Ram, which is simply an intact male sheep. A lamb is a young sheep. 

After that came a blazing nova reported in Chinese and Korean astronomical records.

It lit up the sky in February or early March, proclaiming the Christ child’s birth. “The Chinese Chronicle the Ch’ien-han-shu for example, records that a new start was cited near Theta Calais in March of 5 BC and remained visible for 70 days. Seventy days or 10 weeks was time enough,” according to this theory, the Magi to follow the star in their journey across the deserts from the east.  There’s an entire area of study around this subject alone, but it’s clear from records all over the world that Jupiter and Saturn met up together in the sky (at least from our Earthly point of view, making it extra bright in the sky as they appeared to converge.) DID YOU KNOW? The magi who came to Bethlehem to adore the infant Christ were neither quote wise men” nor “kings,” as later story had it, but astrologers. The biblical Greek term Magos referred to a specific Persian cast of astrological Seers.

Want to experience more? Please check out my newest book on Amazon. It’s a fantastic gift that gives us a potent preview into to the most history-making events coming next year and how to make the most out of them:

book cover The 2020 Guide Astrology of Happiness
Now available in Audio, Digital, and Hardback versions! ✨
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